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Suze Orman Calls 4% Rule DANGEROUS for Retirement

Updated: Jun 24






Episode Summary: The primary fear of many Christian investors is running out of money in retirement. In this episode, Ridgeway explores the concept of the 4% retirement rule and its implications in today's economic climate, drawing insights from financial experts like Suze Orman.


Key Takeaways:

  1. The 4% Retirement Rule: Ridgeway explains the origin of the 4% retirement rule, coined by financial planner Bill Bengen, which suggests retirees can safely withdraw 4% of their retirement savings annually. However, recent critiques by experts like Suze Orman have labeled it as "very dangerous."

  2. Economic Volatility and Withdrawal Rates: Orman advises caution in relying solely on the 4% rule, advocating for lower withdrawal rates, especially in times of economic uncertainty. She emphasizes the importance of adjusting withdrawal rates based on individual circumstances and market conditions.

  3. Personalized Financial Planning: Ridgeway stresses the need for personalized financial planning, highlighting the significance of considering various sources of income, such as Social Security and annuities, alongside retirement savings. He encourages listeners to work with financial professionals to tailor their withdrawal strategies accordingly.

  4. Long-Term Financial Sustainability: Orman suggests that withdrawing the least amount possible from retirement accounts can lead to better long-term financial sustainability. This approach aligns with the idea of adjusting withdrawal rates to ensure financial security throughout retirement, especially amid economic fluctuations.

  5. Working with Professionals: Ridgeway emphasizes the value of seeking guidance from financial advisors to navigate retirement planning effectively. He underscores the importance of ongoing evaluation and adjustment of withdrawal strategies to adapt to changing financial landscapes.


Quotes:

  1. "Susie Orman calls the 4% retirement rule very dangerous. These are dog whistles for those who are preparing for retirement."

  2. "People love these hyperboles. I would never, I always, this is amazing. This is horrible. This is just trying to stir up emotions. It's not that serious."

  3. "Find the figure, find out what works for you, trial and error, year over year, work with a professional, simple."



retired couple reviewing their investments

 

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As Christians, we were taught to be good stewards over our tithing and giving to the less fortunate. But when it came to our personal finances and investing we were left clueless on what the Bible says. What does the Bible say about managing debt, leaving a legacy, investing, and planning for your retirement? Mr. Christian Finance answers these and many other questions because we want to teach you how to become rich and righteous!


Meet A.B. Ridgeway:


A.B. Ridgeway with his hands up

A.B. Ridgeway, MBA (info@abrwealthmanagement.com) is the owner and Christian Financial Advisor with A.B. Ridgeway Wealth Management. With a decade in the finance industry, his goal is to give believers clarity around the most confusing topic in the Bible, money, and tithing. A.B. Ridgeway helps tithing Christians become cheerful givers but unlocking their money-making potential, so they can prosper and be the great stewards of the wealth God has entrusted them with.


*Disclaimer: This communication is not intended as an offer or solicitation to buy, hold or sell any financial instrument or investment advisory services. Any information provided has been obtained from sources considered reliable, but we do not guarantee the accuracy or the completeness of any description of securities, markets or developments mentioned. This is strictly for information purposes. We recommend you speak with a professional financial advisor.

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